AMPT Coffee advertised as ‘natural testosterone booster’: AMPT Coffee is the third coffee product in the past year to be recalled because laboratory analysis found it contains a prescription drug that is similar to the active ingredient in Viagra. The coffee was advertised as being “a natural testosterone booster made with tongkat ali, maca root and guarana” capable of boosting the libido, but there’s a hitch. The secret ingredients—drugs called Sildenafil and Tadalafil—can be deadly when combined with the nitrates frequently found in heart and blood pressure medications. In its warning notices, the FDA reported “a growing trend of dietary supplements or conventional foods with hidden drugs and chemicals,” although the products are often presented as being “all natural.” Little is known about the company, which was registered a little more than a year ago in Texas. Owners are listed on the filing as Kristopher Bergmann and Andrew Glokowski; no information could be found on Bergmann, but “Action” Andrew Glokowski, CEO of A&L Investments in Chicago, touts the coffee and partnership on his Linked In page. READ MORE

CYBER SECURITY

Malware is out there, infiltrating industry processes: Nobody knows if last month’s WannaCry ransomware affected any food or beverage companies. But WannaCry wannabes and other industrial malware are out there, actively infiltrating processes in other industries. Oil and gas, power, and pharmaceutical industries have been favorite targets, according to Eric Byres, a longtime cyber security expert who now runs the bespoke consulting business ICS Secure. READ MORE

FOOD SAFETY

Aldi removes Dutch eggs from shelves: A major German supermarket chain said today it is removing all eggs from sale in its German stores amid a scare over possible pesticide contamination that Dutch egg producers fear will cost them millions of euros in lost income. Aldi said there’s not believed to a health risk, but effective immediately the company will only accept eggs that have tested negative for the pesticide Fipronil. Belgian eggs have also been implicated in the scare, and Belgium’s food safety agency is probing how the pesticide might have entered eggs destined for supermarkets. since Fipronil is banned in products for treating animals that are part of the human food chain. READ MORE

Fake vodka, anyone? A suspected fake vodka factory has been raided in Aintree in the United Kingdom, with almost 2,000 liters of potentially toxic alcohol seized. The seized alcohol was sent out for chemical analysis, but a similar investigation in the UK two years ago identified antifreeze in the vodka. READ MORE

Salmonella cuts wide swathe through tiny community: Twenty people have been confirmed with Salmonella infections after eating at the Red Door Coffee restaurant in West Point, located in northeast Nebraska, and another eight people are sick with suspected  salmonellosis, says the regional health department. The public’s help is sought in finding the source of the bacteria, since eating at the restaurant is the only thing the people seem to have in common. The population of West Point, the county seat of rural Cuming County, was just 3,364 at the time of the 2010 census, so illness is cutting a wide swathe through the community.  READ MORE

Horsemeat means jail time: Two UK businessmen have been jailed for their part in a scheme that netted more than $260,000 in U.S. currency. The plot was exposed after inspectors found horse identification chips in supermarket-read meals. READ MORE

FDA Import Alert didn’t stop import of tainted papayas: The FDA Import Alert system doesn’t seem to be working too well, since an outbreak of Salmonella kiambu apparently linked to eating Maradol papayas imported from Mexico. The outbreak has sickened 47 people and taken one life so far, despite the fact that Mexican papayas are subject to “countrywide detention without physical examination.” The alert was the result of a 2011 Salmonella outbreak that sickened more than a hundred people. READ MORE

Farm animals probably caused E. coli outbreak: Infected farm animals followed by person-to-person contamination were the likely cause of an E coli O157:H7 outbreak that killed two children and sickened 10 others in a remote community on the Utah-Arizona border. Public health officials say the outbreak in Hildale, Utah, and Colorado City, Ariz., was likely caused by animal manure containing  E. coli O157:H7 bacteria  being spread by humans. The two communities have historically been the home to polygamous families belonging to the break-away Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. READ MORE