China is a ‘key growth area’: A bowl of ice cream on a hot day in Shanghai gave American Mitchell Weinberg the worst bout of food poisoning he can recall. It also inspired the then-trade consultant to set up Inscatech — a global network of food spies. In demand by multinational retailers and food producers, Inscatech and its agents scour supply chains around the world hunting for evidence of food industry fraud and malpractice. He says that China continues to be a key growth area for fraudsters, and that he’s  uncovering fraud about 70 percent of the time (in China, make that close to 100 percent). READ MORE

FOOD SECURITY

Baby eels are prize commodity: Changes in the worldwide fisheries industry have turned live baby American eels into a commodity that can fetch more than $2,000 a pound at the dock, but the big demand and big prices have spawned a black market that wildlife officials say is jeopardizing the species. “Elvers” are often are sold to Asian aquaculture companies to be raised to maturity and sold to the lucrative Japanese restaurant market, where they mainly are served grilled. READ MORE

FOOD SAFETY

Pesticide leads to world’s largest shell egg recall: Dutch egg producers’ practice of mixing the toxic insecticide Fipronil with a cleaning agent and sanitizer known as “Dega 16” for use around chickens has apparently led to the world’s largest recall of shell eggs since 2010. Fipronil was found in sufficient levels to cause 180 poultry farms in the Netherlands to be closed. Enough insecticide was found on another 59 Dutch farms for their eggs to require health warnings for children. Countries around the world are on guard because of the Dutch egg scandal. READ MORE

Another importer recalls papayas: A third produce importer in the U.S. is recalling whole, fresh maradol papayas grown and packed by Carica de Campeche in Mexico because a deadly, ongoing Salmonella outbreak has been traced to papayas from the farm. More than a hundred people across 16 states have  confirmed Salmonella infections traced to the farm’s papayas, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some 35 victims have been hospitalized and one person has died. READ MORE

Is your tuna toxic? Tuna caught in industrialized areas of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans have 36 times more pollutants than those fished in remote parts of the West Pacific, scientists from Scripps Oceanography have found. The researchers tracked concentrations of toxins in tuna around the world and found that the location of fish, as much as its species, can affect how safe it is to eat. READ MORE

Histamine poisoning sickens hundreds: Potentially hundreds of people across Europe have been sickened by histamine poisoning caused by fish. Histamine forms when certain fish are not properly refrigerated before being cooked or processed. Tuna, sardines, mackerel and anchovies are among the species that can cause histamine poisoning. Histamine is not destroyed by cooking, freezing or canning. READ MORE

TERRORISM

Terrorists join forces: In a troubling turn of events, the Taliban and Islamic State jointly massacred dozens of civilians in an Afghan village, highlighting rare co-operation between the insurgents. The fighters killed more than 50 men, women and children in the remote Sayad district of northern Sar-e Pul province on Saturday after overrunning a government-backed militia in a 48-hour battle, according to local officials. READ MORE

Another acid attack: Firefighters hosed down a teenager in London’s Kensington Gardens after a suspected acid attack this morning. Emergency services responded to the incident shortly before 10:30am, according to the fire brigade. The city has been troubled by a spate of acid attacks in recent months. READ MORE

MISCELLANEOUS

Update on Wayne Farms fire: The Wayne Farms poultry processing plant near Jack, Ala., that was evacuated on Friday morning because of an electrical fire is still closed because of major damage to the plant’s main circuit board, a spokesman told MeatingplaceREAD MORE

A banana’s secret life: On a hot day in June, the Hermann Hesse slipped into New York Harbor and headed for the Red Hook Container Terminal in Brooklyn. The 550-foot container ship, flying the Liberian flag, had come some 3,000 miles from Ecuador. It had gone through the Panama Canal, picked up cargo in the Caribbean and weathered a few squalls. Its arrival in Brooklyn was only the beginning for the bananas on board. READ MORE

 

 

 

On a hot day in June, the Hermann Hesse slipped into New York Harbor and headed for the Red Hook Container Terminal in Brooklyn. The 550-foot container ship, flying the Liberian flag, had come some 3,000 miles from Ecuador. It had gone through the Panama Canal, picked up cargo in the Caribbean and weathered a few squalls.

Its arrival in Brooklyn was only the beginning for the bananas on board.

a hot day in June, the Hermann Hesse slipped into New York Harbor and headed for the Red Hook Container Terminal in Brooklyn. The 550-foot container ship, flying the Liberian flag, had come some 3,000 miles from Ecuador. It had gone through the Panama Canal, picked up cargo in the Caribbean and weathered a few squalls.

Its arrival in Brooklyn was only the beginning for the bananas on board.

a hot day in June, the Hermann Hesse slipped into New York Harbor and headed for the Red Hook Container Terminal in Brooklyn. The 550-foot container ship, flying the Liberian flag, had come some 3,000 miles from Ecuador. It had gone through the Panama Canal, picked up cargo in the Caribbean and weathered a few squalls.

Its arrival in Brooklyn was only the beginning for the bananas on board.

a hot day in June, the Hermann Hesse slipped into New York Harbor and headed for the Red Hook Container Terminal in Brooklyn. The 550-foot container ship, flying the Liberian flag, had come some 3,000 miles from Ecuador. It had gone through the Panama Canal, picked up cargo in the Caribbean and weathered a few squalls.

Its arrival in Brooklyn was only the beginning for the bananas on board.

a hot day in June, the Hermann Hesse slipped into New York Harbor and headed for the Red Hook Container Terminal in Brooklyn. The 550-foot container ship, flying the Liberian flag, had come some 3,000 miles from Ecuador. It had gone through the Panama Canal, picked up cargo in the Caribbean and weathered a few squalls.

Its arrival in Brooklyn was only the beginning for the bananas on board.