Restaurants are popular targets: Crowded restaurants are a popular target for terrorists worldwide. Most recently, 20 people were killed in an attack on a popular tourist restaurant in the west African country of Burkina Faso. At least eight foreigners and seven locals were among those killed in Sunday’s evening attack on the Aziz Istanbul cafe in the capital city of Ouagadougou, the government said. The gunmen, thought to be jihadists, fired on customers on the terrace before making their way inside. In January 2016, terrorists killed 30 people during coordinated attacks on a restaurant and two hotels in Ouagadougou. Groups calling themselves Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and Al-Mourabitoun took credit for that attack. A popular tactic is to stage several attacks at close to the same time, with preliminary attacks drawing the attention of police and emergency personnel. This strategy was followed during Paris’ Bataclan Theater massacre in November 2015. Attacks occurred at five restaurants in the city before the major assault at the theater. READ MORE

Prepping for a third world war? As the rhetoric ramps up over North Korea and nuclear weapons, the cash registers have been ringing at a Detroit Army Supply store, where some are apparently prepping for a third World War. The manager says he’s been selling a lot of “prepper items” over the past week or so. “In addition to all the normal prepper stuff, end of the world stuff. A lot of water prep stuff, food, MREs — the military meals,” he says. And there’s been a substantial increase in the sale of a particular item they don’t sell much of — a so-called radiation antidote called potassium iodide. READ MORE

FOOD SECURITY

TPP was a lifeline for ag sector: For much of industrial America, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) was a suspect deal, the successor to the North American Free Trade Agreement, which some argue led to a massive offshoring of U.S. jobs to Mexico. But for the already struggling agricultural sector, the sprawling 12-nation TPP, covering 40 percent of the world’s economy, was a lifeline. It was a chance to erase punishing tariffs that restricted the United States—the onetime “breadbasket of the world”—from selling its meats, grains and dairy products to massive importers of foodstuffs such as Japan and Vietnam. READ MORE

FOOD SAFETY

Europe seeing increase in Cyclospora infections: European labs are being urged to consider testing for Cyclospora, following an increase in cases for the third successive year. Many of the cases—but not all—occurred in people who had vacationed in the Riviera Maya and Cancun regions of Mexico. People can become infected with Cyclospora by consuming food or water contaminated with the microscopic parasite. People living or traveling in countries where cyclosporiasis is endemic may be at increased risk for infection. READ MORE

Contaminated-egg scare spreads: Fifteen EU countries as well as Hong Kong and Switzerland have received eggs contaminated with the insecticide fipronil, the European Commission says. Eggs, coming mainly from the Netherlands, have been found to contain fipronil, a pesticide used to kill lice and ticks on animals, which is banned by the EU for use in the food industry. It is thought the pesticide was used to combat lice in some chicken farms, affecting the eggs of laying hens. READ MORE

MISCELLANEOUS

A new twist on military-style ready-to-eat meals: Amazon.com Inc is exploring a technology first developed for the U.S. military to produce tasty prepared meals that do not need refrigeration, as it looks for new ways to muscle into the $700 billion U.S. grocery business. The world’s biggest online retailer has discussed selling ready-to-eat dishes such as beef stew and a vegetable frittata as soon as next year, officials at the start-up firm marketing the technology told Reuters. READ MORE

The oldest fruit cake ever: Move over, Twinkies. You’ve been bested in the “food that refuses to decompose” department, and the contest wasn’t even close. Conservators with the New Zealand-based Antarctic Heritage Trust recently discovered a 106-year-old fruitcake in Antarctica’s oldest building, a hut on Cape Adare. A fruitcake is a dense, brick-like confection spiked with lumps of dried fruit and nuts that is traditionally regifted at Christmas. It is known for its long shelf life, although usually not 100 years long. READ MORE